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Re: BOB - Bug-out-Bag

PostPosted: Wed Sep 03, 2014 8:01 pm
by Josephus
I know a man that does private contracting work. Used to work for blackwater and before that was in the special forces. I was going to pick up some quick clot and found the civilian kind at the time only came in pads and asked him how I could get the powder. He told me that it was not worthwhile. It produces a chemical burn that can be worse than the initial injury and that is why it was switched over to the low chemical gauze pads. He said if it is bad enough to need quick clot then you really should be using a tourniquet anyway.

Take that for what it is.

Re: BOB - Bug-out-Bag

PostPosted: Wed Sep 03, 2014 8:50 pm
by MBI
Do you have a change of clothes rolled up in a waterproof bag in your BOB? You never know what you'll be wearing when you grab the bag and run. Might be wearing clothing and footwear that is totally unsuitable to a survival situation. Plus if there are low temps you might want to add those clothes to what you're wearing for extra insulation, or to change out of wet clothes in winter to avoid hypothermia.

I'd also add two or three large CLEAR plastic garbage bags. They can be used in several different ways to get fresh water, used along with your tarp (or instead of your tarp if something happens to it) for shelter, or to wrap up and waterproof the contents of your bag if needed.

I'd also add a couple disposable lighters as an alternate firestarter.

Do you have a good pocketknife in there too?

Re: BOB - Bug-out-Bag

PostPosted: Wed Sep 03, 2014 9:28 pm
by rerun12
good thread, i love reading about other peoples loadouts.

here are a couple cool sites for gear that could really come in handy, and most of it can be worn on your person:
http://store.lawindustries.co.uk/
http://www.oscardelta.co.uk/

i recommend the sere black ops belt and this cool little necklace that i forget what they call:
Image
its made from kevlar cord on a breakaway lanyard which can be used as a friction saw, has a zirconia disc that can be used to sharpen knives, spark a ferro rod and break tempered glass with alight strike. also has a universal handcuff key in case you are unlawfully detained. pretty cool and quite cheap.

also, these are the most rugged and comfortable pair of shoes ive ever owned: http://www.amazon.com/Salomon-Ultra-Tra ... o+3d+ultra

friend of mine is on his fourth tour in the middle east and swears by them as well

a topographical map of your area and predefined destinations for where to go and weather the storm is a good addition to any BOB also

oh, and a giant +1 to MBI's suggestion of the Stiletto TiBar. awesome tool

Re: BOB - Bug-out-Bag

PostPosted: Wed Sep 03, 2014 9:59 pm
by xeo
MBI wrote:Do you have a change of clothes rolled up in a waterproof bag in your BOB? You never know what you'll be wearing when you grab the bag and run. Might be wearing clothing and footwear that is totally unsuitable to a survival situation. Plus if there are low temps you might want to add those clothes to what you're wearing for extra insulation, or to change out of wet clothes in winter to avoid hypothermia.

I'd also add two or three large CLEAR plastic garbage bags. They can be used in several different ways to get fresh water, used along with your tarp (or instead of your tarp if something happens to it) for shelter, or to wrap up and waterproof the contents of your bag if needed.

I'd also add a couple disposable lighters as an alternate firestarter.

Do you have a good pocketknife in there too?


Change of clothes no, would take up far too much room. Although another undershirt and pair of socks wouldn't be a bad idea. If my shoelaces break as mentioned by sandman I could make new ones with paracord or fishing line. Plastic bags aren't a bad idea. Collecting water I would use the 40oz thermus. The bag itself is actually waterproofed, triple polyurethane coated. I've dismissed the idea of a pocket knife since I have a gigantic gerber knife, and I always carry two pocket knives with me everywhere I go, so those will likely be with me.

What is your reasoning for the lighter? Quick instant flame? I've owned a Zippo and I wasn't impressed at all to say the least.

Re: BOB - Bug-out-Bag

PostPosted: Wed Sep 03, 2014 11:58 pm
by MBI
xeo wrote:Change of clothes no, would take up far too much room. Although another undershirt and pair of socks wouldn't be a bad idea.

While bulky, in the past I've found it to be worth the space if you're out in the boonies, but since you're in an urban area I guess you have a possibility of scrounging up replacements if it comes down to that. A change of socks can be like a mini vacation if you're having to hoof it long distances, or to just keep your feet healthy if they get wet. They're also nice as improvised mittens in winter or at night when the temp drops.

xeo wrote:Plastic bags aren't a bad idea. Collecting water I would use the 40oz thermus.

You can use the clear plastic to make a solar still. Another variant of the solar still idea is to put a clear plastic bag around the leafy end of a tree branch and tie the opening tight against the branch to keep the air inside, then as the air heats in the sun the leaves release surprising amounts of water that will accumulate at the bottom of the bag. You can also use them (along with your tarp) to collect rainwater and funnel it into any containers you have (thermos, empty tuna cans, etc). They make a half decent poncho if you cut head and arm holes. Your backpack sounds rather full, so if you end up scrounging for supplies somewhere you probably won't be able to fit any liberated food or other supplies in there. A plastic bag can be handy for temporarily carrying any useful items you might run across. They weight almost nothing and can be folded pretty tightly so they don't take up much space in your backpack until the time comes when you need them.

xeo wrote:I've dismissed the idea of a pocket knife since I have a gigantic gerber knife, and I always carry two pocket knives with me everywhere I go, so those will likely be with me.

Yeah, if you always carry a pocket knife then it'd be a bit redundant having one in the bag if you're trying to save space and weight.

xeo wrote:What is your reasoning for the lighter? Quick instant flame? I've owned a Zippo and I wasn't impressed at all to say the least.

Fire is so crucial if you're roughing it. I never like to put all my eggs in one basket by relying on only one method of fire starting. For example, if all the available tinder is a little damp, it's a lot easier to heat it up and get it to light so you can start a proper fire by using a lighter. Firesteels are nice but they don't mix well with damp tinder. I'd also recommend learning at least one or two methods of fire starting using only improvised materials, like a fireboard, bow drill, etc. Just in case.

It's nice that Zippos can be refilled, but that same feature can be a downside if it's stored for a long time as the fuel can evaporate out of it, leaving you high and dry. I'd go with a two or three disposable lighters over a Zippo. Just personal preference.

Also, most people are not very prepared so a lighter is an excellent item for use in a trade during the type of emergency situation where you'd be using a BOB.

Re: BOB - Bug-out-Bag

PostPosted: Thu Sep 04, 2014 12:51 am
by GWiens2001
Have a set of very oversized cammies in my BOB. Why so large? As MBI says, you can pull it on over your existing clothes for insulation. AND you can stuff leaves, grasses, or whatever between your inner clothes and outer layer for extra insulation if you are in a very cold area without having to keep changing what clothes are in there based on the season.

And +1 on the plastic trash bags. Must be more than a hundred uses for them.

A pocket hammock is great too. You can sleep in it, use it for camo netting, net some fish or birds to eat.

Gordon

Re: BOB - Bug-out-Bag

PostPosted: Thu Sep 04, 2014 3:04 am
by oldbiscuit
I'd put in a small tin of char cloth, best thing to get a fire started.

Re: BOB - Bug-out-Bag

PostPosted: Thu Sep 04, 2014 3:26 am
by GWiens2001
I keep a film canister filled with drier lint. That stuff will light with any spark!

Gordon

Re: BOB - Bug-out-Bag

PostPosted: Thu Sep 04, 2014 12:28 pm
by andrex66it
looks like your bag is missing a small sewing kit?
you know, to close those nasty wounds (ugh!)or repairing tears in jacket/pants etc

Re: BOB - Bug-out-Bag

PostPosted: Thu Sep 04, 2014 3:14 pm
by youluckyfox
Has anyone seen CAT-Tourniquets, before? If so, any thoughts?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tzXNsfesUb0&index=1&list=PLlju0PNcKThabp1AZfX1_RuJ9xtX-d1XD

Re: BOB - Bug-out-Bag

PostPosted: Thu Sep 04, 2014 5:47 pm
by mister sour
youluckyfox wrote:Has anyone seen CAT-Tourniquets, before? If so, any thoughts?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tzXNsfesUb0&index=1&list=PLlju0PNcKThabp1AZfX1_RuJ9xtX-d1XD

I have a few. Tourniquets seem necessary, but a belt can do that job. If you tourniquet a limb, you will lose what ever is after the tourniquet... usually. Gotta stop the bleeding though! Bleed and die.

Re: BOB - Bug-out-Bag

PostPosted: Thu Sep 04, 2014 6:30 pm
by ForSquirel
youluckyfox wrote:Has anyone seen CAT-Tourniquets, before? If so, any thoughts?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tzXNsfesUb0&index=1&list=PLlju0PNcKThabp1AZfX1_RuJ9xtX-d1XD


It's what we carry at work. Nothing more than a tourniquet you can apply yourself. small compact and easy to use.

Re: BOB - Bug-out-Bag

PostPosted: Thu Sep 04, 2014 7:28 pm
by xeo
andrex66it wrote:looks like your bag is missing a small sewing kit?
you know, to close those nasty wounds (ugh!)or repairing tears in jacket/pants etc


Jacket for winter is a Carhartt. It will not tear, trust me. Pants would be Old Navy jeans. Those will tear maybe under heavy stress. That is where the fishing line comes in. I'd rather not add more unnecessary weight when I can solve the same problem with other items I already have.